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Las Canteras, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria

Gran Canaria Guide

If you want to find out about Gran Canaria, your first stop should be our (Tourist) Guide. Gran Canaria is the perfect island on which to spend your holiday. A multi-faceted destination, you can enjoy many features you normally wouldn't find in such a small area.

Las Canteras, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria

Gran Canaria Photos & Video

We've got thousands of professional Gran Canaria photos for you to enjoy, from nature to nightlife, accommodation to beaches and excursions.

Enjoy our galleries!

Lighthouse of Sardina

Gran Canaria Agora

Looking for that special place to make your holiday even more perfect? We've got them all in our "Agora", a luxury version of the Yellow Pages. All organisations or businesses that are related to Gran Canaria are listed on our Agora, with interactive maps, photos, videos and of course contact details. You can immediately see what other people thought of them too.

Las Canteras, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria

Gran Canaria Forum

Lots of volunteers are helping out to answer any question you might have related to your holiday on Gran Canaria. Or maybe you're planning to live on Gran Canaria? Check our forum out!

Rural accommodation on Gran Canaria

Gran Canaria Accommodation

Soon we'll open up our Accommodation section, where you'll be able to book hotels, apartments, villas and rural accommodation straight from the owners for the best prices. Until then, just visit our Directory's Accommodation part.

Huerto de las Flores, Agaete, Gran Canaria

Classified Ads

If you've got something to sell or if you're renting out property or so, just go straight to our Classified Ads. It's completely free to place your ad. And obviously, if you're looking for a bargain, a second hand turbo drill running on sunflower oil, it's your place too!

Gran Canaria sunset

Gran Canaria Weather

Gran Canaria enjoys the world's best climate. As one of the seven islands of Eternal Spring, it's almost never too hot or too cold on Gran Canaria. With an average temperature of 24º Celcius, you can be sure to enjoy being outside, no matter what season.

Splash in the ocean between Puerto Rico and Amadores

Gran Canaria News

Stay updated on what's happening on Gran Canaria. We pick the important news stories and place them on our site in English. Not just the tourism related stories, as well stories that are interesting for residents. If you like Gran Canaria, you just might want to know what's keeping people on the island busy.

Temperatures

Welcome to Gran Canaria Info

Gran Canaria: Far More Than Just Resorts (Says Lonely Planet)
Gran Canaria away from the resorts (Temisas town)

Most travel articles about Gran Canaria mention its resorts in the first paragraph. It's as if the whole island is tainted because lots of people want to spend a couple of weeks in the sun. This travel industry cliché drives us mad but there are encouraging signs that things are changing.


The Lonely Planet, long the sneerer-in-chief, now admits that there is more to the islands than chicken and chips for €3.99. In its section about Gran Canaria's resorts it even manages a compliment:


"This is not Benidorm, or even Los Cristianos in Tenerife. In the centre you are more likely to stumble across expensive hotels or smart apartment blocks than Dot-and-Alf-style English pubs".

In fact, the Lonely Planet website is complimentary about Gran Canaria, stating that if you look past the "garish tiara of purpose-built holiday resorts", the island is, "a rare Canary Island where you feel that there are still secret places to explore".

Amen to that!
If anyone from the LP reads this, Las Palmas' old district of Vegueta is cracking but it isn't a UNESCO World Heritage Site (yet).
Condemning Gran Canaria because it has resorts is like arguing that the package and porn hell-hole that is Pattaya makes the whole of Thailand a lesser destination, or that London isn't worth bothering with because it is close to Bracknell.


You can visit Gran Canaria and not even step foot in the Maspalomas or Playa del Inglés. Or stay in a quality hotel (two island hotels made the Tripadvisor Top Twenty-five Most Popular Hotels in Spain list for 2013), rent a car and explore the rest of the island.  Alternative Gran Canaria starts at the gates of the resorts.
From olive groves to cave restaurants and empty beaches to Spain's best outdoor shopping area, Gran Canaria surprises everyone who makes the effort to get to know it.


Gran Canaria's Olive Renaissance
Las Palmas: Europe's Latino City

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Olives ripening at Temisas: The heartland of olive country in Gran Canaria
Olives growing at Temisas in Gran Canaria

Gran Canaria is lucky that olive trees live a long time and don't bear grudges. For centuries the island's olivos were used as windbreaks and goat shade, their fruit pickled in mojo sauce or left to rot. Then, about 10 years ago, someone decided to crush a few olives and taste the oil. 

Gran Canaria olive oil turns out to be delicious and farmers lucky enough to have olive trees on their land are relearning what their grandparents forgot. Our olives have gone from aperitif to the stars of the table.

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Gran Canaria Oilve Oil: There's Gold In Them There Hills
Olives growing at Temisas in Gran Canaria

Gran Canaria is lucky that olive trees live a long time and don't bear grudges. For centuries the island's olivos were used as windbreaks and goat shade, their fruit pickled in mojo sauce or left to rot. Then, about 10 years ago, someone decided to crush a few olives and taste the oil. 

Gran Canaria olive oil turns out to be delicious and farmers lucky enough to have olive trees on their land are relearning what their grandparents forgot. Our olives have gone from aperitif to the stars of the table.


 Old Trees: New Tricks
There were presses in Gran Canaria in the 16th century so the Spanish must have planted olives as soon as they arrived. Most Canarian trees are old varieties that are rare elsewhere in Spain while one, the Verdial de Canarias, is unique to the islands.


These old cultivars give Gran Canaria olive oil a distinctive flavour: Fruity with a herbal edge  like the smell or ripe tomatoes. It also has that peppery after taste that tickles the back of your throat: A classic sign of great olive oil.
Gran Canaria's olive trees grow on terrain too steep for mechanical harvesting so the whole crop is hand-picked. Since 100 kilos of island olives yields only 16.5 litres of oil all production is cold-pressed extra virgin olive oil. 


The best Gran Canaria olive oil is sold unfiltered (therefore slightly cloudy) in local markets at 5 euros per 250 ml. You can also buy it in shops in the resorts but expect to pay more. Drizzle your oil on a simple salad or eat with crusty bread to appreciate the flavour. Don't combine it with balsamic vinegar (it's too strong and everyone is sick of the stuff).

Olive Country
There are olive trees all ov
er the south east of Gran Canaria from Telde to San Bartolome but Temisas, between Santa Lucia and Agüimes, is the olive's heartland. The island's oldest olive press is in the village and it was here that the industry restarted. You can't miss the olivos fringing the terraced fields as you come into Temisas, especially if the trees are wearing their white hats in the wind. Bars and shops in the village sell the oil.


Temisas in Gran Canaria with olive and palm trees
Olive and palm trees in Temisas

There Is More To Olives Than Oil


So far the olive boom hasn't affected the supply of fresh olives in the markets. They taste horrible unless you cure them but the process is simple and worthwhile. It takes too long to do on holiday but if you live in Gran Canaria take advantage (and congratulations on a fine choice of island).
Look out for fat olives in the markets in November and December, or head to Temisas for the pick of the crop. The best ones are deep purple with a pointy end and soft, creamy flesh. To cure, nick each one with a knife and put them in an empty garafa (big plastic water bottle). Fill
with water salty enough to float an egg and leave for two weeks. Then change the water and wait another two weeks.


Gran Canaria Oilve Oil: There's Gold In Them There Hills
Temisas olives with mojo

To check if your olives are cured taste one: If your mouth puckers up wait another two weeks. When they are ready they are as good as the kalamata olives from Greece sold in little tubs in posh London delis. Bung them in mojo if you must, or store in olive oil or salty water before serving them smugly to your friends.

Gran Canaria's ancient olive trees, freshly pruned and fertilized, are standing proud again: The island has found yet another way of turning sunshine into gold.

A Fruit Best Eaten Naked And On The Beach
Navel Oranges: Gran Canaria's Winter Bounty
A Guide To Traditional Canarian Food

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Valleseco town square, one of Gran Canaria's many hidden spots

Valleseco is one of the prettiest and least visited towns in Gran Canaria. It makes its own cider, although it is even harder to find than the place itself. So far we haven't tried a drop!

Dry In Name

The name Valleseco means "dry valley". Unless this refers to the lack of cider it's a misnomer: The town, tucked away in the north central hills above Teror, is one of the wettest places on the island. It even sells itself as a "green oasis of life" on its tourist website.

The Sights

The church, pictured above, is surrounded by a pretty and surprisingly ele
gant square full of plane trees. It holds an old German organ and a chunk of saint's arm bone. Valleseco has a butcher, a fishmongers, a bar called La Herradura (The Horseshoe) and not much else. It's one of those towns where people move slowly and seem to live forever. Don't stop for lunch as there is no restaurant in town.

Valleseco has an 80-year old gofio mill and the tourist info office in the town hall displays local craft works; mostly woven baskets (weekdays only, of course). There isn't much else to do except wander about. Look out for old Canarian houses with tile roofs covered in endemic Aeonium or rock rose plants.
The best time to visit is at the end of May or beginning of June when the town honours Saint Vicente Ferrer, or on the first Sunday of October for the apple festival. 

In Search Of Cider

Valleseco is surrounded by fields of old apple and plum trees. Until recently they were abandoned but the orchards have received a new lease of life thanks to the town hall's cider initiative. Valleseco cider is like the flat cider served in Asturias in the north of Spain, rather than the fizzy Gaitero stuff you get in the shops. It's sold as sidra reineta "Gran Valle" and is excellent.
Or that's what the lucky people who have tried the stuff tells us. There isn't a bottle on the island at the moment as last years vintage, all 17,000 bottles of it, was bottled in April and drunk by November. The owner of the bar told us that the manzanero won't be bottling this year's vintage until April.

On a more positive note last year's crop of apples yielded 70,000 bottles, which should be enough to last until our next visit. We'll let you know what it's like.

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Read the original: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DoingStuffOnGranCanaria/~3/Gcqm63KfBb4/gran-canaria-secrets-cider-of-valleseco.html


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Gran Canaria Secrets: The Cider Of Valleseco
Valleseco town square, one of Gran Canaria's many hidden spots

Valleseco is one of the prettiest and least visited towns in Gran Canaria. It makes its own cider, although it is even harder to find than the place itself. So far we haven't tried a drop!

Dry In Name

The name Valleseco means "dry valley". Unless this refers to the lack of cider it's a misnomer: The town, tucked away in the north central hills above Teror, is one of the wettest places on the island. It even sells itself as a "green oasis of life" on its tourist website.

The Sights
The church, pictured above, is surrounded by a pretty and surprisingly ele
gant square full of plane trees. It holds an old German organ and a chunk of saint's arm bone. Valleseco has a butcher, a fishmongers, a bar called La Herradura (The Horseshoe) and not much else. It's one of those towns where people move slowly and seem to live forever. Don't stop for lunch as there is no restaurant in town.

Valleseco has an 80-year old gofio mill and the tourist info office in the town hall displays local craft works; mostly woven baskets (weekdays only, of course). There isn't much else to do except wander about. Look out for old Canarian houses with tile roofs covered in endemic Aeonium or rock rose plants.
The best time to visit is at the end of May or beginning of June when the town honours Saint Vicente Ferrer, or on the first Sunday of October for the apple festival. 

In Search Of Cider

Valleseco is surrounded by fields of old apple and plum trees. Until recently they were abandoned but the orchards have received a new lease of life thanks to the town hall's cider initiative. Valleseco cider is like the flat cider served in Asturias in the north of Spain, rather than the fizzy Gaitero stuff you get in the shops. It's sold as sidra reineta "Gran Valle" and is excellent.
Or that's what the lucky people who have tried the stuff tells us. There isn't a bottle on the island at the moment as last years vintage, all 17,000 bottles of it, was bottled in April and drunk by November. The owner of the bar told us that the manzanero won't be bottling this year's vintage until April.

On a more positive note last year's crop of apples yielded 70,000 bottles, which should be enough to last until our next visit. We'll let you know what it's like.

Like the sound of Gran Canaria? Join us on Facebook for daily photos and news.
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The best Indian curry restaurant choices in Las Palmas de Gran Canaria
Curry in Las Palmas

Indian food in Las Palmas has always been thin on the ground despite the city's large Sindi population. Now we are spoilt for choice with five Indian restaurants in the Puerto district alone. If you fancy an Indian in Las Palmas, here are your options:


Oso Polar
Calle Sagasta 17

The Oso Polar is the oldest Indian restaurant in the port but serves a decidedly strange curry. The food tastes like it was cooked by someone who was told what Indian food is like but has never actually eaten it. The only time we ate there (which was a few years ago) we came out feeling like someone had tried to poison us with cinnamon. One a more positive note, one of our friends goes there every time he comes to Las Palmas for their nan kima. Cheap and cheerful, although the chef needs to lay off the artificial colourings.

Club Hindustánico
Leon y Castillo 415-417

This is actually the Hindu community's private club although the restaurant is open to everybody. It's up on the second floor of a residential building so takes a bit of finding. The Club Hindú does a good curry and excellent starters.The service has always been friendly but there has been a recent change of guard and we have heard mutterings that it isn't as good as it used to be. We can't confirm them as we haven't been for a while.

The Curry House
Calle Portugal 13

Formerly the Taj Majal and conveniently located one block back from the beach, The Curry House does good enough curry without being remarkable.

Nawabi
Jesus Ferrer Jimeno 7


Nawabi is where the old guard from the Club Hindustanico have moved to. It's big and well decorated and the service is friendly. The food is excellent, if slightly salty. Until recently this was our favourite Indian restaurant in Las Palmas ...

Aanand
Franchy Roca 13/ Esquina Tomas Miller

So new it even has a
Facebook page, Aanand is excellent. The chicken jalafrezi is superb and the lamb s tender as it gets. We prefer the starters at the Club Hindustánico but for everything else this is by far our favourite Indian restaurant in Las Palmas. The only problem is that we went last Thursday and were the only people there.

For the sake of our curry futures please go and try Aanand.  Let us know what you think!

Do you know of any other Indian restaurants in Las Palmas? Let us know and we will go and try them and add them to the list.


Don't miss these other Las Palmas food posts:

Modern Spanish Food: The Allende Restaurants 

Read the original: http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/DoingStuffOnGranCanaria/~3/iLVSF9XMJ1k/indian-food-in-las-palmas.html


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